Faculty & Departments

Marketing MBA courses

MARK 60100 Marketing Management
2 Credit Hours

This course is designed to provide students with a systematic approach for making marketing decisions and to give students practice in the analysis, design, implementation, and control of marketing strategies. It is an operationally oriented course in which the application of marketing concepts, principles, strategies and methods is emphasized. 

MARK 60200 Global Marketing
2 Credit Hours

We live in a "global village," and business firms must compete in the global marketplace. Two decades ago, the phrase "global marketing" did not even exist. Today business firms look to global marketing for the realization of their full business and commercial potential and for their very survival in the increasingly competitive global marketplace. Thus, developing global marketing strategy to compete effectively in the global marketplace is one of the most critical challenges facing firms today. Firms must formulate a long-run dynamic strategy that will provide sustainable competitive advantage by enabling the firms to anticipate, respond and adapt to the complexity and rapid pace of change in the global marketplace. This course helps students learn relevant concepts, theories and current practices on designing, executing, organizing and controlling effective marketing strategies and planning for global competition.

MARK 60500 Advertising Management
2 Credit Hours

Advertising Management provides an opportunity to lean the management process through which organizations, taking a collaborative approach to consumers, develop and present messages of value that engage targeted audiences and encourage attitudinal, emotional, and behavioral responses.  In cases, we explore advertising decision-making in corporations that take a consumer-centered approach to marketing.  This course is intended to serve students who anticipate careers as brand managers and as marketing managers.

MARK 60550 Seminar in Consumer Behavior Research
2 Credit Hours

Managers wishing to serve customers' needs can build effectively upon an understanding of the field of consumer behavior. This class offers an in-depth exposure to this area. Prior work in consumer behavior is not required; the course will begin at an introductory level. Illustrative topics include the consumer marketplace, consumer motivation, consumer perception, consumer attitudes, consumer decision-making, cultural and social influences, advertising and salesperson influences, market segmentation and marketing and advertising regulation. The seminar will include the examination of a number of significant academic research studies as well as marketing applications.

MARK 60801 Relationship Marketing 
2 Credit Hours

Increasingly, firms are attempting to build longer-term relationships with customers, suppliers, competitors and other shareholders as a basis for achieving competitive advantage. This course explores the emerging paradigm of relationship marketing and attempts to provide a structure and overview of its relevant dimensions. It focuses on the systematic development and maintenance of collaborative exchange relationships both internal and external to the firm. Primary emphasis will be given to organizational exchange and industrial marketing and service relationships with secondary focus on final customer associations.

MARK 63900 Exploring Frontiers of Marketing Thought
2 Credit Hours

This is a niche course aimed at understanding the contributions to marketing thought that are being developed in the academic sphere of marketing.  The course involves reading journal articles and meeting with some of the people involved in doing this thinking:  ND faculty and a few leading professors from other universities.  The course requires intellectual curiosity and enthusiasm, and a willingness to contribute to the success of our venture. Enrollment will be limited and by invitation only.

MARK 70100 Marketing Research
2 Credit Hours

Market information is critical for firms. Without it, organizations operate blindly and the likelihood of misinformed and erroneous decisions is greatly increased. Accordingly, the goal of the course is to inform participants how to engage in market research. Specifically, students will learn (a) to critically evaluate what information is necessary to make more informed decisions, (b) the various approaches organizations use to obtain that information, and (c) the most commonly used techniques necessary to analyze the data.

MARK 70150 Qualitative Marketing Research
2 Credit Hours

Qualitative research methods are spreading rapidly among firms across industry boundaries, in recognition of the fact that marketers often have no systematic intuition about or affinity for the segments to which they cater. As managers are exhorted to "get closer" to the consumer, they must divine unarticulated needs and anticipate intersections of their own industry with others. This course is designed to help you distinguish the actual lived experience of consumers from the assumptions of the firm. That is, you will seek authentic consumer insight. Our emphasis is on the managerial implications of prolonged engagement with consumers. You will analyze and interpret the experiential and functional dimensions of product/service/brand essence. You will learn to conduct rapid appraisals using qualitative methods, and to supervise diagnostic research into marketing problems. This class will observe a seminar-workshop format, and depend for its energy upon discussion of ongoing field research projects that student teams will conduct in naturalistic settings. This course will be immediately useful to careers in consulting and entrepreneurship, technology, category and brand management, new product development, advertising and marketing research..

MARK 70200 Business-to-Business Marketing I
2 Credit Hours

The Marketing Planning Process learned in this course can itself serve as a unique and important differentiator for helping your company to capture new business. The process emphasized and learned in this course will be especially beneficial for anyone who envisions being responsible for top line revenue growth – especially those aspiring to positions where career success will be heavily dependent upon one’s proven abilities to bring in profitable new business on a regular basis. Thus, this course will be especially valuable for aspiring high level division, sector, regional or national Marketing executives, aspiring Chief Marketing Officers, aspiring partners in consulting, financial, accounting or legal firms, and aspiring entrepreneurs. Success in all of these careers will be largely dependent upon one’s proven ability to bring in substantial, profitable new business on a regular basis. Students in this course will learn proven, sound theoretical, yet practical processes for doing just that

MARK 70220 Business-to Business Marketing II
2 Credit Hours

This second BIB Marketing course is independent of the first B2B Marketing course and students taking the first course have no advantage over those opting only for this second course. Proving Value is critical for capturing business in evermore competitive B2B markets. The Value Analysis Process learned in this course TO BUILD THE BUSINESS CASE for B2B Market Solutions can itself serve as a unique and important differentiator for helping your company to capture new business. Using the tools, templates and tutorials provided, the emphasis of this course is on learning to build & communicate convincing, financially focused ‘Business Cases’ (‘Financial Vision’) for proving the differential value of any relevant B2B market solution. The process learned will be especially beneficial for anyone charged with the responsibility for assessing and subsequently communicating the differentiated value of one’s B2B market solution. This ability is critical for capturing new customers and growing one’s business.

MARK 70250 Executive Sales Management
2 Credit Hours

This course is a marketing elective designed for graduate business students interested in learning more about professional sales force management and personal selling by firms engaged in business-to-business and consumer goods/services marketing. The objectives of the course are to: Increase students’ understanding of the role, importance and process of personal selling in different marketing situations; Enhance students’ ability to diagnose and address diverse problems and decisions that arise in developing and implementing a firm’s selling strategy; Increase the students’ understanding of sales management function and to increase student’s ability to develop a sales management strategy Lastly, this course will assist in the preparation of students for their first experience in the selling function.

MARK 70300 Brand Strategy
2 Credit Hours

This course brings real world brand challenges, thinking and tasks into the classroom. A blend of theory and practical business issues are achieved through case speakers and written analyses.

MARK 70350 Customer Relationship Management
2 Credit Hours

In this course, students will examine how firms deal with specific elements that drive complexity in Customer Relationship Management (CRM) and related initiatives. CRM requires cross-functional coordination and technologies that expand the traditional domain of the marketing function, change the role of the marketing manager and affect how the marketing manager interacts with other members of the organizations.  Students will be encouraged to view CRM holistically by evaluating the impact of strategic, operational and analytical CRM initiatives on performance outcomes for both customers and firms. More specifically, students will focus on the impact of CRM, from the marketing manager’s perspective. The course requirements and format include lectures, case analyses, student-led discussions and short papers.

MARK 70360 Pricing Strategies
2 Credit Hours

The broad purpose of this course is to allow students to develop an understanding of the basic frameworks, analytical techniques, and strategic and tactical options for pricing goods and services. The course brings together concepts from managerial economics, marketing strategy, and consumer behavior to frame the interplay among costs, competition, and customers in the pricing decision-making process.  Specific topics that are addressed include: the roles of costs and perceived value in the determination of a price; understanding and measuring consumer response to price and to the framing of price information; new product pricing; product-line pricing; price optimization technology; price discrimination tactics (price bundling, yield management, two-part tariffs); price promotion in retailing.

MARK 70450 New Product Marketing
2 Credit Hours

This course provides an opportunity to develop both conceptual and tacit knowledge of important methods and processes used in the development and evaluation of new product concepts. The course is intended to serve students who anticipate careers in product management or who otherwise expect to be involved in the marketing of new products.  In more concrete terms, I would expect that by the end of the semester you will be able to: appreciate the usefulness of observation and interviewing in understanding  user needs; properly report insights from interviews and observation and convert these insights into statements of customer needs and requirements that can be used to guide concept development; contrast the benefits and limitations of alternative creative problem solving processes for generating new product ideas; recognize the importance of industrial design processes and principles to new product development; analyze a new product concept to assess whether it has the characteristics typically associated with market success; write concept statements that clearly and precisely reflect what the product is promising to the target market; design “traditional” concept tests that will generate the needed insights on potential buyers’ perceptions, beliefs, and expectations about the concept; be conversant with the uses, assumptions, and limitations of conjoint analysis methods for concept evaluation; specify the tradeoffs involved in product-line decisions such as adding variety and launching replacement products; identify the primary barriers to adoption of a new product.

MARK 70550 Culture, Consumption and Marketing
2 Credit Hours

Contemporary marketing requires a holistic understanding of fantasy and behavior as they interact in marketplaces around the globe. This course will help you comprehend, stimulate, manage and resist desire as you unpack the forces that shape and reflect the culture(s) of consumption. You will grasp the market as a complex system of material and metaphysical interactions, and learn to manipulate these interactions in a prosocial, ethical manner. Tempering interdisciplinary perspectives with a symbolic cast and combining the techniques of systematic introspection with participant observation, you will examine the many ways that consumption ramifies throughout daily life. Marketer and consumer misbehavior will also be probed. Cultural, subcultural, generational, class, lifecourse and group influences on marketing and consumption will be investigated. Semiotic interpretation, cross-cultural analysis, scenario planning, trend projection and other frameworks are employed throughout the quarter. This course is especially useful if you want to comprehend the “human” aspects of marketing, especially as they influence the “technical”, and if you seek insight into the deep structure of your own motivations. Its most immediate relevance is to careers in consulting and entrepreneurship, category and brand management, new product development, advertising and multicultural marketing.

MARK 70800 Leadership Marketing
2 Credit Hours

Policies, strategies and tactics that provide the fundamental opportunity for all enterprises to organize and direct institutional energy in an interconnected process that achieves superior relative and absolute outcomes. The course will include cases (with one page memo), selected readings, vigorous class discussion, guest participation by enterprise policy officers and a modest, but compelling final exam.