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MENDOZA IN THE NEWS

Unattractive People More Likely to Be Bullied at Work

Publication: Science Daily

July 17, 2013


The following is an excerpt from Science Daily that quotes Management Professor Tim Judge on his research that links attractiveness to cruelty in the workplace. Similar articles were published in MSN News, Economic Times (India), CityTownInfo.com  and EurekAlert. To read the entire article visit: Unattractive People More Likely to Be Bullied at Work


It's common knowledge that high school can be a cruel environment where attractive students are considered "popular," and unattractive kids often get bullied. While that type of petty behavior is expected to vanish with adulthood, new research proves it does not.

Colleagues can be just as immature as classmates.

The study by Timothy Judge, professor of management at the University of Notre Dame's Mendoza College of Business, and Brent Scott from Michigan State University is the first to link attractiveness to cruelty in the workplace.

In "Beauty, Personality, and Affect as Antecedents of Counterproductive Work Behavior Receipt," recently published in Human Performance, the researchers examine counterproductive work behavior and its effect on employees. They show that physical attractiveness plays as much of a role as personality in how a person is treated in the workplace.

The researchers surveyed 114 workers at a health care facility, asking them how often their co-workers treated them cruelly, including saying hurtful things, acting rudely and making fun of them. Through digital photos, the workers' "attractiveness" was then judged by others who didn't know them.

"Our research is novel because it focuses on how coworkers treat attractive and unattractive colleagues," says Judge, who specializes in management psychology, gender, leadership personality and career and life success. "We find that unattractive individuals are more likely the subject of rude, uncivil and even cruel treatment by their coworkers. And, not only do we, as a society, perceive attractive and unattractive coworkers differently, we act on those perceptions in ways that are hurtful."